Fighting for Freedom and Fairness


Judge: No quick trial on NC voting law changes

Dec. 13, 2013

A federal judge has ruled there will be no trial on North Carolina's Republican-backed voting law changes until after the 2014 elections, though she signaled motions will be considered to bar the measures from taking effect until the case is resolved.


Read more here: http://www.newsobserver.com/2013/12/12/3454229/judge-to-weigh-trial-schedule.html#storylink=cpy

Read more here: http://www.newsobserver.com/2013/12/12/3454229/judge-to-weigh-trial-schedule.html#storylink=cpy

Read more here: http://www.newsobserver.com/2013/12/02/3426973/nc-courts-are-short-of-personnel.html#storylink=cpy

To read more, click here.


Judge to weigh trial schedule on NC voting changes

A federal judge was set to hear arguments Thursday over whether a trial on the legality of recent Republican-backed changes to North Carolina's voting laws should be held before or after the November 2014 election.


NC courts are short of personnel, and that threatens justice

What happens when courts are overloaded with cases, when the technology system that supports those courts is woefully outdated and when judges, rather than get adequate funding from the state, have to go to counties for money?


Firearms Rights Restoration & The North Carolina Felony Firearms Act

Since 1971, the North Carolina Felony Firearms Act, G.S. § 14-415.1 et seq, has generally banned felons from owning or possessing firearms. But the Act, its applicability and constitutionality are far from settled. The General Assembly has amended the Act several times over the years to further restrict felons’ firearms rights. But more recently it altered this course, responding to new constitutional standards articulated by the North Carolina Supreme Court in Britt v. State, by amending the Act to provide for a firearms rights restoration process. 363 N.C. 546 (2009). This paper explains the major provisions of the Felony Firearms Act, particularly firearms rights restoration, in light of Britt and the decision of the Court of Appeals in Baysden v. State. ___ N.C. App. ___, 718 S.E.2d 699 (2011).


An Analysis of Voter Identification Requirements in Crawford v. Marion

As lawsuits attacking North Carolina’s voting and election law reforms proceed through the courts, opponents of such reforms will argue that various provisions of the new law are unconstitutional. The voter photo identification argument appears to have attracted the most attention and the lawsuits have raised some concerns about the constitutionality of voter ID requirements. These concerns will be addressed and dispelled by analyzing the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Crawford v. Marion County Election Bd., 553 U.S. 181 (2008), a case challenging Indiana’s Voter-ID law. To date, this is the only Voter-ID case that the Supreme Court has considered (however, the Supreme Court heard oral arguments on Arizona’s Voter-ID law on March 18, 2013). In a 6-3 decision, the Court refused to strike down Indiana’s Voter-ID law.


Quick Reference Guide to Firearms Rights Restoration & the North Carolina Felony Firearms Act

This quick reference guide summarizes the North Carolina Felony Firearms Act, its applicability, relevant exceptions, firearm restoration rights, and important court cases dealing with the Act’s constitutionality


The NC
Institute for Constitutional Law wants you to know…


Operation Constitution Distribution

NCICL has updated constitutional pamphlets. We try to make these pocket-sized copies of the state constitution available to public officials and citizens across the state. With your support, we can provide a copy to even more elected officials so they can carry the constitution with them as they represent you. The more support we receive the more constitutions we can distribute.

 

Please consider making a tax deductible donation to help fund  NCICL's Operation Constitution Distribution. Every contribution counts. Just $5 can help us distribute 3 more constitutions. Click here to help.


NCICL’s mission is to educate the public, bar, and policymakers about constitutional issues. In an effort to do this, we provide a limited number of free pocket-sized copies of the N.C. State Constitution. If you would like to request a copy, email your name and address to: info@ncicl.org. NC residents only. For multiple copies, please call us for pricing. If you are requesting copies for a group or organization, we ask that only one contact person submit the request.